Problem no. 16, 2003


Färgglad linje



The problem

The Danish newspaper Berlinske Tidende recently published this deal from the Danish team championship for club teams (North dealer, East-West vulnerable).

S 8 7 5 3
H 10 9 7 6 2
D
C 8 6 4 2
S Q 4 Table S A 9 6
H J 8 5 H
D Q 10 5 3 2 D A J 9 8 7 6
C A K 10 C J 9 5
S K J 10 2
H A K Q 4 3
D K 4
C Q 7

In one of the matches, Peter Schaltz, North, opened the bidding with 2 diamonds, showing a weak hand with both majors. After pass from East, his wife Dorthe thought 4 hearts should be a decent spot, so she bid it. Nobody objected to that, but with the queen of spades offside, she had to lose four tricks; +50 East-West.
   At the other table East-West bid more than their counterparts.

South West North East
pass 1 D
1 H 2 H 4 H 5 D
d'ble pass pass pass

2 hearts showed diamond support and at least invitational values. When South doubled 5 diamonds, the third Schaltz player in the team – West, with Martin as his first name, son to Peter and Dorthe, who already is a big name in international junior bridge – didn't have to consider raising to slam.
   East was Sabine Auken, one of the top female bridge players in the world, and of course she made her doubled game. She even made an overtrick; +950 East-West.
   Now I wonder: How did she make that overtrick?


Solution

When South leads a heart honor, it looks plain sailing if East ruffs, cashes the ace of diamonds and then uses dummy's club entries to eliminate hearts. When South gets on lead with the king of diamonds, he is endplayed.
   But that is not the correct solution. Sabine took her twelve tricks much, much simpler: by playing her cards from the top in all suits...
   Take a closer look at the deal above and you will notice something strange. Namely that one card is missing. That card is the three of clubs, and since East only has 12 cards she is the one who shall have it.
   So, Berlinske Tidende's bridge writer had published a deal with only 51 cards. This is how it should have been:

S 8 7 5 3
H 10 9 7 6 2
D
C 8 6 4 2
S Q 4 Table S A 9 6
H J 8 5 H
D Q 10 5 3 2 D A J 9 8 7 6
C A K 10 C J 9 5 3
S K J 10 2
H A K Q 4 3
D K 4
C Q 7

With a fourth club in the East hand, it's no problem to take twelve tricks, by simply discarding a spade from dummy. One of our winners, Manuel Paolo of Lisboa, Portugal, put it this way: "I think Sabine got the club three to complete her hand. Then, any player who is not a beginner wins 12 tricks."


[ The competition | Back ]

Avdelare

Copyright © 2009, Scania Bridgekonsult